Books Available for Adoption

Displaying 1 - 10 of 16 books available for adoption..

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Books Available for Adoption
Cover of Afro-Americans in Dentistry

Afro-Americans in Dentistry

By Clifton O. Dummett & Lois D. Dummett. Los Angeles: C. Dummett, c1978.
Adoption Amount: $450   Adoption Type: Preserve for the Future
Library: Smithsonian Libraries Research Annex

African American dental practices were first documented in 18th century when dentistry was a crude trade learned by apprenticeship to perform necessary extractions. Extramural dentistry is the practice of exercising dental expertise outside of the institution and bringing dental care and education into the community. In this book, Clifford O. Dummett, D.D.S., and Lois Doyle Dummett, B.A., thread together the dental milestones and contributions in African American history. Their overview addresses such issues as race, segregation, education, and how community dentistry is a... Read More
Birth of the Cool - color portrait

Birth of the Cool

By Barkley L. Hendricks. Durham, NC: Nasher Museum of Art, c2008.
Adoption Amount: $500   Adoption Type: Build the Collection
Library: Smithsonian Libraries Research Annex

Birth of the Cool may be the coolest book you’ll ever see. In this 2008 exhibition catalog of his first retrospective, Barkley L. Hendricks distills black identity into powerful three-quarter and full-length portraits that teem with style and attitude. His sitters are unapologetic in their self-presentation, and the result is a phenomenal elevation of African Americans who would have otherwise gone unnoticed in the decades immediately following the civil rights movement. The title of this catalog, edited by Trevor Schoonmaker, stems from the iconic 1957 Miles Davis album that came to... Read More
Cover of Compliments of Standard Rice Company, Inc., millers of rice since 1902

Compliments of Standard Rice Company, Inc., Millers of Rice Since 1902

Houston, Tex.: The Firm, [193-?].
Adoption Amount: $350   Adoption Type: Preserve for the Future
Library: Smithsonian Libraries Research Annex

This promotional recipe booklet is a striking adverstisment for White House Cereals.  Most likely published in the late 1930's, the front cover is fashioned as a 3-D commercial food carton while the back cover displays their full product line.  Bright yellow and die-cut, this booklet was intended as an eye-catching calling card.  Die-cutting dates back to the Victorian era when industrial machines could mass-produce and print the same attractive shapes over and over again, like the celebrated Victorian-era Valentines.  The recipes within "contributed by both... Read More
Huey excerpt in Land where time stands still

Land Where Time Stands Still

By Max Miller. New York: Dodd, Mead & Company, 1943.
Adoption Amount: $300   Adoption Type: Build the Collection
Library: Smithsonian Libraries Research Annex

In 1941, Max Miller financed an expedition the length of the Baja Peninsula with two natural history scientists from the San Diego Natural History Museum, Frank Gander and Laurence Huey. Miller mentions briefly and ominously of the Japanese submarine presence in Magdalena Bay on the Baja Peninsula in the months prior to Pearl Harbor.  This book came to the Smithsonian Libraries by way of Alexander Wetmore. As an expeditionary scientist and Assistant Secretary of the Smithsonian throughout World War II, Wetmore took interest in the in the scientific travels of others,... Read More
Tangent tables calculated by Emma Gifford

Natural Tangents

By Emma Gifford. Manchester, England: A. Hegwood & Son, 1920.
Adoption Amount: $500   Adoption Type: Preserve for the Future
Library: Smithsonian Libraries Research Annex

The history of women as “computers”— those who do the hard mathematical work of science— goes farther back than the “Hidden Figures” of NASA. Emma Gifford, M.B.E. was one, working around the Great War (World War 1) on books like Natural Tangents, determining the complex calculation of trigonometric functions, nominally to aid her husband’s work in optics. But her results, which “should have a place in every college library and in every physical laboratory” according to one review, were unmatched in her time, an era when the results of functions were best found on the mind-boggling... Read More
16th-century textile designs

Ornamental Textile Fabrics of All Ages and Nations

By Auguste Dupont-Auberville. London: Asher, 1877.
Adoption Amount: $450   Adoption Type: Build the Collection
Library: Smithsonian Libraries Research Annex

Ornamental Textile Fabrics of All Ages and Nations: A Practical Collection of Specimens features specimens from Auguste Dupont-Auberville's collection of ornamental textile designs. The samples, reproduced as simple chromolithographs, serve as a showcase of European, Eastern, and Egyptian design elements used in textile production throughout history. Published in 1877 amid the Aesthetic Movement, on the heels of the burgeoning Arts and Crafts Movement, and at a time when great craftsmanship of the past was being revived as art for art’s sake; this sample book is intended to be a... Read More
Cover of Practical Gold-Mining

Practical Gold-Mining

By Charles G. Warnford Lock. New York: E. and F. N. Spon, 1889.
Adoption Amount: $650   Adoption Type: Preserve for the Future
Library: Smithsonian Libraries Research Annex

Imagine that you are a Victorian gentleman with a reasonable income and a mid-life crisis. You hear about a gold strike somewhere in the far corners of the earth (to you, at least). In hopes of turning your bourgeois into gorgeois, you pack up your things and say "Toodle-oo" to the missus. What’s the first thing you buy to prepare for your new adventure? A book, naturally! Specifically, you want Charles G. Warnford Lock’s Practical Gold-Mining. Lock was a veteran miner of ores, and he codified that knowledge into an exhaustive and beautifully illustrated 788-page handbook of... Read More

Sinking of the "Titanic"

By Jay Henry Mowbray. Harrisburg, Pa.: The Minter Company, 1912.
Adoption Amount: $750   Adoption Type: Preserve for the Future
Library: Smithsonian Libraries Research Annex

How fast could you write a 300 page book? Sensationalist journalist Jay Henry Mowbray turned out this edition of The Sinking of the Titanic (complete with illustrations and ready for sale) by May 11, 1912, less than a month after the ship struck that infamous iceberg. Speed puts this book into a curious genre—the “instant book.” The instant book narrates a contemporaneous event through a collage of sources, like government hearings or embellished descriptions, coalesced by journalists, then sold door-to-door as soon as possible. But why the need for speed? Like today, the American... Read More
Map from Statistical Atlas of the United States

Statistical Atlas of the United States

By Walker, Francis A.. Department of the Interior, Census Office, 1874.
Adoption Amount: $1,600   Adoption Type: Preserve for the Future
Library: Smithsonian Libraries Research Annex

In Booker T. Washington’s landmark autobiography Up From Slavery, he gives one of the earliest accounts of the "Black Belt." This term was first used geographically for the band of dark, rich soil that runs through the Deep South. But, after the Civil War, the Black Belt became descriptive of its high population of freed African Americans who stayed in the vicinity of the plantations on which they were once enslaved. The Statistical Atlas of the United States (published in 1870) depicted this demography by pioneering the use of infographics, rarely seen before this date and never with... Read More
Cover of The Great Chili Confrontation by H. Allen Smith

The Great Chili Confrontation

By H. Allen Smith. New York: Pocket Books, 1969.
Adoption Amount: $350   Adoption Type: Preserve for the Future
Library: Smithsonian Libraries Research Annex

Before cooking competitions on reality TV, a 1967 throwdown chili cookoff, commemorated in The Great Chili Confrontation, rocked the state of Texas and led to today’s World Chili Champion Cookoff (WCCC). When humorist H. Allen Smith wrote “Nobody Knows More About Chili Than I Do” in Holiday magazine, protesting cries erupted from the Lone Star State at the effrontery of a Midwesterner claiming superiority at their state dish. So in October of ’67 in Terlingua, Smith went head to head with Wick Fowler for the championship. It was declared a tense tie. Soon, the International Chili... Read More

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