Books Available for Adoption

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Books Available for Adoption
Page of colored shell illustrations

The Mineral Conchology of Great Britain

By James Sowerby. London, $b Printed by Benjamin Meredith; and sold by the author, J. Sowerby; White and Co.; Sherwood and Co.; and by all booksellers in town and country, $c 1812-[1846]:
Adoption Amount: $800   Adoption Type: Build the Collection
Library: Joseph F. Cullman 3rd Library of Natural History

James Sowerby (1757-1822), artist, naturalist, and mineralogist, did nothing by half-measure. From 167 plates on minerals of the world, to a 36-volume work on British plants, and even to a treatise on color, Sowerby’s work is indeed expansive. This book, one volume of seven on invertebrate paleontology, is no different. Sowerby’s detailed illustrations of his own fossil collection, accompanied by his engaging writing style, made his Mineral Conchology a classic in the field. In it, he names numerous new species, and paleontologists still cite his work in their publications. Read More
Histological Classification XII

Histological Classification, Volume XII

By Kiupel, M.. Washington, D.C.: Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (World Health Organization), 2008.
Adoption Amount: $300   Adoption Type: Build the Collection
Library: National Zoological Park Library

This fascicle has detailed descriptions and explanatory notes of various endocrine system tumors, cross-referenced to corresponding high-quality color photomicrographs. It is highly referenced to related publications, very well laid-out, and systematic.  The material is exhaustive, thoroughly covering all of the major tumors, by system, and detailing how to distinguish between them for diagnosis.  This is one of a valuable, and very well-used, series on tumor classification of the different organ systems.   Read More
L'Art Japonais - vol. 2 - Cover

L'Art Japonais, V. 2

By Louis Gonse. Paris: A. Quantin, 1883.
Adoption Amount: $850   Adoption Type: Preserve for the Future
Library: Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Library

Louis Gonse (1846-1921) was a French writer, art critic, and director of the Gazette des Beaux-Arts. He was also an early collector of Japanese art. In 1883, he organized an exhibition on the art of Japan and published his book, L’Art Japonais. Gonse was aided in much of his research by the Japanese art dealer Hayashi Tadamasu (1853–1906) who was also instrumental in introducing Japanese art to Europe. This book was the first serious work on the subject, making Gonse’s reputation as a specialist on Japanese art. L’Art Japonais had a profound influence on French “japonisme” and... Read More
North American Indian costumes (1564-1950) v. 2

North American Indian costumes (1564-1950) v. 2

By Oscar Brousse Jacobson. Nice, France: Editions d'Art C. Szwedzicki, 1952.
Adoption Amount: $1,500   Adoption Type: Build the Collection
Library: Joseph F. Cullman 3rd Library of Natural History

This portfolio volume (vol.2 of the work) contains 25 illustrations by the noted Native American artist Oscar Howe (Mazuha Hokshina). A Yanktonai Dakota artist trained at the Studio of Santa Fe Indian School, the Dakota Wesleyan University, and the University of Oklahoma, Howe is perhaps best known for his 1940s, New Deal-era Works Progress Administration (WPA) murals. Jacobson, a collector of Native American art and director of the University of Oklahoma's School of Art, provides a brief introductory essay on indigenous dress, along with lengthy captions for each plate, incorporating... Read More
Arizona highways.

Arizona Highways - v.20-21 (1944-1945)

[Phoenix: Arizona Department of Transportation], 1944-1945.
Adoption Amount: $500   Adoption Type: Build the Collection
Library: Smithsonian Libraries Research Annex

“Civilization Follows the Improved Highway.” That was, and still is, the motto of the enduring and always alluring travel magazine Arizona Highways. This copy of volumes 20 and 21 covers 1944-1945. It was first published in the 1925 as an engineering newsletter by the Arizona Highway Department. By the 1930’s, it had segued into a magazine documenting the road construction of the expanding highway system throughout Arizona. In the 1940’s, the magazine excelled as one of the first color-illustrated travel magazines at the forefront color printing technology. Arizona... Read More
Arizona highways.

Arizona highways - v.22-23 (1946-1947)

[Phoenix:: Arizona Department of Transportation], 1946-1947.
Adoption Amount: $500   Adoption Type: Build the Collection
Library: Smithsonian Libraries Research Annex

“Civilization Follows the Improved Highway.” That was, and still is, the motto of the enduring and always alluring travel magazine Arizona Highways. This copy of volumes 22 and 23 covers 1946-1947. It was first published in the 1925 as an engineering newsletter by the Arizona Highway Department. By the 1930’s, it had segued into a magazine documenting the road construction of the expanding highway system throughout Arizona. In the 1940’s, the magazine excelled as one of the first color-illustrated travel magazines at the forefront color printing technology. Arizona... Read More
Darkest Africa_Title Page vol. 1

In Darkest Africa, Volume 1

By Henry M. Stanley. New York: C. Scribner's Sons, 1890.
Adoption Amount: $550   Adoption Type: Preserve for the Future
Library: Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute Library

Volume 1 of 2, this account of Stanley’s adventures to “save” Emim Pasha, Governor of Equatoria (present day South Sudan), was wildly popular and published in six languages. One of the greatest feats in African travel, Stanley traveled thousands of miles in his claims to the great stretches of continental African territory, from Lake Victoria to the Indian Ocean. As noted by the publisher, "It may be safely asserted ... that no work of travel of this magnitude was ever before produced in so short a space of time." The Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute Library holds a small... Read More
Darkest Africa_tp vol 2

In Darkest Africa, Volume 2

By Henry M. Stanley. New York: C. Scribner's Sons, 1890.
Adoption Amount: $650   Adoption Type: Preserve for the Future
Library: Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute Library

Volume 2 of 2, this account of Stanley’s adventures to “save” Emim Pasha, Governor of Equatoria (present day South Sudan), was wildly popular and published in six languages. One of the greatest feats in African travel, Stanley traveled thousands of miles in his claims to the great stretches of continental African territory, from Lake Victoria to the Indian Ocean. As noted by the publisher, "It may be safely asserted ... that no work of travel of this magnitude was ever before produced in so short a space of time." The Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute Library holds a small... Read More
Village in Manyuema

Across Africa

By Verney Lovett Cameron. London: Daldy, Isbister & Co, 1877.
Adoption Amount: $250   Adoption Type: Build the Collection
Library: Warren M. Robbins Library, National Museum of African Art

Verney Cameron, author of this book, was the first European to cross Equatorial Africa, coast to coast and mostly on foot.  His original mission was to search for the missing explorer David Livingstone, but soon after leaving Zanzibar (an island off Africa’s east coast) early in 1873, he learned that the great man had died. Curiosity drove him on; nearly three years later, he emerged on Africa’s west coast, in Angola, sick and exhausted but with a fabulous story to tell.  His journal includes detailed social, ethnological, and geographical observations and an important... Read More
Cameron's camp at Lupanda

Across Africa

By Verney Lovett Cameron. London: Daldy, Isbister & Co, 1877.
Adoption Amount: $250   Adoption Type: Build the Collection
Library: Warren M. Robbins Library, National Museum of African Art

Verney Lowett Cameron, author of this account, was the first European to cross Equatorial Africa, coast to coast and mostly on foot.  His original mission was to search for the missing explorer David Livingstone, but soon after leaving Zanzibar (an island off Africa’s east coast) early in 1873, he learned that the great man had died. Curiosity drove him on; nearly three years later, he emerged on Africa’s west coast, in Angola, sick and exhausted but with a fabulous story to tell. His journal includes detailed social, ethnological, and geographical observations and an... Read More

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