biologist

Parasitic Protozoa

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This comprehensive and scholarly text covers a wide variety of parasitic protozoans found in humans and other animal species. The articles, written by a variety of expert authors, contain thorough and detailed descriptions. This text is used by veterinarians and pathologists, including the staff of Smithsonian's National Zoological Park, to identify and manage parasitic protozoa.

Mathematical Modeling of Biological Systems

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“The basic premise of this book is that mathematical procedures are useful, and sometimes necessary, for the description and understanding of biological systems,” writes author Harvey J. Gold. Biological systems are among the most complex systems studied by scientists. Models are used to explain systems and to study different variables in an objective way. Today most mathematical models are run on computers, but when this book was published in the 1970s, computer information systems were relatively new and most equations were calculated manually.

The Biology of the Cell Surface

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Biologist Ernest Everett Just (1883-1941) is considered to be one of the most brilliant African American scientists of his era.  Born in Charleston, SC, he earned scholarships to attend northern schools, graduating top of his class at Dartmouth. He taught at Howard University where he became head of the new zoology department. He also studied fertilization in marine invertebrates at the Woods Hole Marine Biological Laboratories and eventually earned his Ph.D. in experimental embryology at the University of Chicago in 1916.

Rangeland Ecology and Management

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Grazing. Fire. Water. All issues important out West, all issues pertinent to rangeland ecology and management, and all addressed in this comprehensive book. For scientists who study natural processes, such as the research staff at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (where this book resides), there is much to be learned from this text. Deer, insects, and other herbivores graze, and grazing has impacts on plant physiology and morphology, energy flow through ecosystems, and other ecosystem effects. Fire and water also profoundly shape both managed and natural systems.