Humphry Davy papers and correspondence

Sir Humphry Davy (1778-1829) is best known for his work in chemistry including the discovery of several new elements and the chemical basis of electrical interactions, as well as the invention of a miner's safety lamp. The Humphry Davy Papers in the Dibner Library of Science and Technology include correspondence, documents, and a portrait of Davy, with the items dating from 1803-1837. Included in the collection is a signed correspondence from Davy regarding his discovery of alkali metals which predates his published paper on the discovery.
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Sir Humphry Davy (1778-1829) is best known for his work in chemistry including the discovery of several new elements and the chemical basis of electrical interactions, as well as the invention of a miner's safety lamp.

The Humphry Davy Papers in the Dibner Library of Science and Technology include correspondence, documents, and a portrait of Davy, with the items dating from 1803-1837. Included in the collection is a signed correspondence from Davy regarding his discovery of alkali metals which predates his published paper on the discovery. He also details an experiment in which he uses a Volatic pile (early battery) to pass an electrical current through molten potash, which creates metallic globes that burst into flame.

Along with the scientific and general correspondence is a poem by Davy entitled "Nonsense Verses. The Death of the Weasel."

Transcription of the Humphrey Davy Papers courtesy the Smithsonian Transcription Center https://transcription.si.edu/project/7823 and digital volunteers.

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