Adopted Books

Displaying 81 - 90 of 677 adopted books..

Pages

The anatomy of the human body

The Anatomy of the Human Body

By William Cheselden. London: Printed for J. F. & C. Rivington [and 4 others], 1784.
Adoption Type: Preserve for the Future
Library: Dibner Library of the History of Science and Technology

Beautifully hand-colored plates are the treasure in this later edition of William Cheselden’s celebrated work on anatomy. This text was first published in 1713, just a year after he was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society. His book was a smashing success, especially among students, though some attribute that success to the fact that it written in English when most medical books at this time were still in Latin. In 1728, Cheselden performed the first known surgery that reversed blindness caused by cataracts. This would be, perhaps, his most famous contribution to medicine had he not been...
The Modern Motor Car

The Modern Motor Car

By Shell-Mex and B.P. Ltd. [London]: [Shell-Mex and B.P., Ltd.], [1933].
Adoption Type: Build the Collection
Library: Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Library

The Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Library has a large collection of pop-up and movable books. Many of these are for children’s entertainment and teaching; some are for the study and demonstration of anatomy and mechanical parts. The Library recently acquired The Modern Motor Car, which has five full-page color illustrations of automobiles and engines, all of which have folding plates which, when lifted, reveal the parts within the moving parts. There is one rather amusing and alarming full-plate of a "Chamber of Horrors" engine, which demonstrates the malfunctions and failures...
Correspondence index :

Correspondence Index: Record of Exhibits to be Procured for Chicago World's Fair 1893

By J. G. Pangborn. Baltimore: 1893.
Adoption Type: Preserve for the Future
Library: Dibner Library of the History of Science and Technology

The World’s Columbian Exposition was a grand celebration of the 400th anniversary of Christopher Columbus’ arrival to the New World in 1492. Held in Chicago in 1893, it featured the latest innovations from around the world including the first ever Ferris Wheel, built by George Washington Gale Ferris himself. This manuscript is the correspondence index of Joseph Gladding Pangborn, a former Civil War soldier who became chairman of the exposition’s World’s Transportation Commission. Responsible for creating the transportation section of the exposition, Pangborn and photographer William Henry...
Title page of Essay on the architecture of the Hindús

Essay on the Architecture of the Hindus

By Ram Raz. London: Published for the Oriental Translation Fund of Great Britain and Ireland by John William Parker, 1834.
Adoption Type: Preserve for the Future
Library: Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Library

The Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Library has an extensive collection of books about European and American architecture and architectural ornament. This copy of the rare 1834 Essay on the Architecture of the Hindús written by Rám Ráz (1790-1830), a native of India, is not a book you would typically expect to find in the collection. The author compares Hindu architecture with the Greek, Egyptian, or later European architecture that is helpful in understanding sources of design, particularly of temple architecture. Forty-eight plates illustrate the different parts of the temple,...
Shaka Zulu

The Assassination of Shaka

By Cecil Skotnes. Johannesburg, South Africa: McGraw-Hill, 1974.
Adoption Type: Build the Collection
Library: Warren M. Robbins Library, National Museum of African Art

The historical Shaka (circa 1787-1828), the greatest of the Zulu kings, was a brave and skillful warrior who became king in 1817.  Through clever diplomacy, unusual military techniques, and strategic assassination, he controlled an empire of some 200,000 square miles. However, increasing military failure and, ultimately, his mother’s death left him a broken man. To mourn his mother, he imposed a nationwide grieving process so bizarre and destructive that his land was devastated and his people deeply traumatized.  In 1828, two of his half-brothers assassinated him. The legendary Shaka—known...
Duala canoe prows

Der Kameruner Schiffsschnabel und Seine Motive

By Leo Frobenius. Halle, Germany: E. Karras, 1897.
Adoption Type: Preserve for the Future
Library: Warren M. Robbins Library, National Museum of African Art

These stunningly ornamental canoe prows glide through the coastal waterways of the Cameroon, where the Duala people live. German anthropologist Leo Frobenius traveled to this bucolic West African setting and documented his findings in this 1897 book. To make this piece even more special, it is one of only nine copies that exist in the United States.
Histoire artistique, industrielle et commerciale de la porcelaine

Histoire Artistique, Industrielle et Commerciale de la Porcelaine

By Albert Jacquemart. Paris: J. Techener, 1862.
Adoption Type: Preserve for the Future
Library: Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Library

This is perhaps the most important 19th century treatise on Chinese porcelain. In it Albert Jacquemart and Edmond Le Blant laid out a classification for different types of porcelain. Many of the terms they developed to describe porcelain remain in use today; Famille Verte, Rose, Noire, and Blanc de Chin. The 26 engraved plates illustrate a number of Chinese and Japanese porcelaines and include the first known example of a Pronk porcelain item. This first edition copy owned by the Freer | Sackler Library remains an important scholarly reference for art historians and collectors of Chinese...
Chinese rock temple in Yangtze Valley and Beyond

The Yangtze Valley and Beyond

By Isabella L. Bird. London: J. Murray, c1899.
Adoption Type: Build the Collection
Library: Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Library

Isabella Bird (1831-1904) (married name Bishop), an English explorer, writer, and photographer was probably one of the most famous of all 19th century women travelers. Her trips took her to Australia, Hawaii, Colorado, India, Ladakh, Persia, Kurdistan, Turkey, and Morocco. On her last great trip in 1897 at the age of sixty-six, she traveled to China where she journeyed along the Yangtze River from Shanghai, visiting among other places, Hangzhou, Yichang, Wan Hsien, and Nanjing. Her book is based on her letters, diary notes, and her photographs. While much of Bird’s narrative focuses on the...
Cover, The Ladies of the White House.

The Ladies of the White House

By Laura C. Holloway. Philadelphia: Bradley and Company, 1881.
Adoption Type: Build the Collection
Library: American Art and Portrait Gallery Library

Laura Holloway’s writing on the wives of the American presidents marks the first of its kind—the first book of First Ladies. Holloway acknowledges that up to 1871, First Ladies had little written about them, primarily about their appearance, and so the author esteems to “give correct impressions of their worth.” The book includes detailed biographies and portraits of the wives and daughters associated with the presidents, and engravings of the significant houses and manors they were associated with, from Martha Washington to Lucretia Rudolph Garfield. Holloway’s sales of The Ladies of...
Andy Warhol's Index Book - soup can pop up

Andy Warhol's Index (Book)

New York: Random House, 1967.
Adoption Type: Preserve for the Future
Library: American Art and Portrait Gallery Library

Giant rainbow noses, alleged tabs of LSD, a pop-up castle, and a can of Hunt’s tomato paste. This book has it all. The infinitely cool world of Andy Warhol and his Factory is captured in Andy Warhol’s Index, a book that mixes gritty, edgy pop art and the interactivity of children books. There are aspects that you would expect to find in an art book such as snippets of interviews and scores of black and white photos of Warhol and his friends and colleagues. But it is the unexpected features that make this book truly rare and charming, including feats of paper engineering, a (...

Pages