Preclarissimus liber elementorum Euclidis perspicacissimi in artem geometrie incipit qu afoelicissime

Euclid; Adelard, of Bath; Campanus, Johannes
Erhardus Ratdolt Augustensis impressor solertissimus, Venetijs impressit, 1482, octauis Cale n. Ju n. [25 May, 1482]
100. This is the first printed edition of Euclid's Elements in the form of a Latin translation from an Arabic source. The work went through thousands of editions and was probably the most studied work after the Bible. It was the leading source for geometric study and learning until the development of non-Euclidean geometries in the 19th century.
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100. This is the first printed edition of Euclid's Elements in the form of a Latin translation from an Arabic source. The work went through thousands of editions and was probably the most studied work after the Bible. It was the leading source for geometric study and learning until the development of non-Euclidean geometries in the 19th century. The book is also a monument to printing history due to the excellent craftsmanship of the printer, Erhard Ratdolt. 
Full Title: Preclarissimus liber elementorum Euclidis perspicacissimi in artem geometrie incipit qu afoelicissime. 
Imprint from colophon: Venetijs impressit : Erhardus Ratdolt Augustensis impressor solertissimus, 1482, octauis Cale n. Ju n. [25 May, 1482]. 
Translated from the Arabic by Adelardus, of Bath, edited by Giovanni Campano. While books I-XIII are genuine (Cf. Th. Heath. The thirteen books of Euclid's Elements. 1956, v. 3, p. 519), book XIV is a work of the 2d cent. by Hypsicles and book XV, the work of a Roman land-surveyor of the 6th cent. 
Signatures: a10 b-r8
Dedicatory letter by Ratdolt on verso of leaf a1. Incipit on leaf a2 printed in red; 3 sided woodcut border. Woodcut diagrams are set in a wide margin close to the theorems to which they relate. Correct reading in line 45, p. [227]. Final leaf blank. 
Cited/Indexed in: Goff E-113; GW 9428 
Our copy has a Burndy Library bookplate: Gift of Stanley M. Loomis. The binding is signed K A with device (key?); attributed to K. Adams.

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